Little Red Riding Gugel

bty

Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?

The gugel was a type of headdress from the 14th century. Mine is made from red wool, lined with white linen and completely handsewn with waxed linen thread. Even though the wool isn’t that thick, it is surprisingly warm. Very nice for cold Visby nights at Medieval Week on Gotland that aren’t quite cold enough to merit a cloak.

dav

Handsewn hem.

Viking Apron Dress

bty

Blue apron dress over red linen dress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had some left over lovely blue wool fabric and an event to go to where I was dressing up as the asynja Idun, so I decided to make a Viking apron dress! Or two thirds of one, the sides aren’t supposed to be open if you want to be period correct. I also added lacing in the back for a better fit – tubular apron dresses are not the most flattering garment for small boobs. The dress is completely hand sewn with waxed linen thread and decorated with a ribbon I had lying around. It is only hemmed at the top, because I figured I might add some gussets in the sides some other time. Here, Im wearing it over my red linen dress – love the combination of red and blue!

mde

These stitches are even Steven!

dav

Eyelets handsewn with silk thread.

dav

Handsewn eyelets reinforced with linen on the inside and finger braided cord with aglet.

mde

Top hem sewn with herringbone stitch (?). They’re called ‘häxstygn’ – witch stich, in Swedish. Or ‘krejstygn’.

bty

Ribbon decoration.

bty

Lacing at the back.

bty

Rawr, I has sword!

Red Medieval Linen (?) Dress

bty

Red linen dress over white linen shift.

What do you do when you’re bored at your family’s summer house and don’t have access to your sewing machine? You go to the local fabric store and find some fabric for a handsewn dress! This one is more inspired my the Middle Ages rather than being any attempt at reproduction. Linen was usually not worn as outer garments, and I’m not even sure it actually is linen. It may be some cotton blend that just looks a bit like linen. But I did handsew it with wasxed linen thread and finger braid my own cord for the lacing. I was going to cast over all of the seams on the inside by hand too, but ran out of time before Medieval Week on Gotland, so mot of them are finished by machine. Even though that isn’t very period correct either, I like the look when you can see the shift under the dress!

mde

Seam sewn and cast over by hand.

dav

Seam sewn by hand but zigzagged by machine.

mde

Hem seen from the inside, sewn with silk thread.

mde

Eyelet hand sewn with silk, finger braided cord and aglet.

Handsewn Medieval Wool Kirtle

bty

So much skirt!

My first attempt at more historically accurate medeival garb. I got very inspired when I was studying textile history, and since I go to Medieval Week on Gotland every year, I thought it was time to try my hand at soemthing more historically accurate. I drew inspiration from kirtles of the mid 14th century, much like the in reeanctment circles popular Moy Bog, but with lacing instead of buttons. I drafted it myself based on the structure found in for example the Bocksten Man’s garb: rectangular pieces and triangular gussets. It is made from green homespun and completely hand sewn with waxed linen thread. The cord for the lacing is finger braided with yellow wool yarn.

Underneath, I wear a linen shift (absolutely required because wool can itch close to the skin and because linen is MUCH more washable than wool).

dav

Finger braided cord, aglet and eyelets sewn with silk and reinforced with linen.

mde

Side seam from the outside.

mde

Hem and side seam from the inside.

bmd

Spiral lacing.